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Anodising

Anodized aluminium

Aluminium alloys are anodized to increase corrosion resistance, to increase surface hardness, and to allow dyeing (colouring), improved lubrication, or improved adhesion. The anodic layer is non-conductive.

When exposed to air at room temperature, or any other gas containing oxygen, pure aluminium self-passivates by forming a surface layer of aluminium oxide 2 to 3 nm thick, which provides very effective protection against corrosion. Aluminium alloys typically form a thicker oxide layer, 5-15 nm thick, but tend to be more susceptible to corrosion. Aluminium alloy parts are anodized to greatly increase the thickness of this layer for corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of aluminium alloys is significantly decreased by certain alloying elements or impurities: copper, iron, and silicon, so 2000, 4000, and 6000-series alloys tend to be most susceptible. Some aluminium aircraft parts, architectural materials, and consumer products are anodized. Anodized aluminium can be found on mp3 players,cookware, cameras, sporting goods, buildings, window frames, roofs, in electrolytic capacitors, auto industry and on many other products both for corrosion resistance and the ability to retain dye. Although anodizing only has moderate wear resistance, the deeper pores can better retain a lubricating film than a smooth surface would.

The coating can crack, but it will not peel. The melting point of aluminium oxide is 2050 °C, much higher than pure aluminium's 658 °C. (This can make welding more difficult.) In typical commercial aluminium anodization processes, the aluminium oxide is grown down into the surface and out from the surface by equal amounts. So anodizing will increase the part dimensions on each surface by half of the oxide thickness. For example a coating that is (12 μm) thick, will increase the part dimensions by (6 μm) per surface. If the part is anodized on all sides, then all linear dimensions will increase by the oxide thickness. Anodized aluminium surfaces are harder than aluminium, although this can be improved with thickness and sealing.

The coating can crack, but it will not peel. The melting point of aluminium oxide is 2050 °C, much higher than pure aluminium's 658 °C. (This can make welding more difficult.) In typical commercial aluminium anodization processes, the aluminium oxide is grown down into the surface and out from the surface by equal amounts. So anodizing will increase the part dimensions on each surface by half of the oxide thickness. For example a coating that is (12 μm) thick, will increase the part dimensions by (6 μm) per surface. If the part is anodized on all sides, then all linear dimensions will increase by the oxide thickness. Anodized aluminium surfaces are harder than aluminium, although this can be improved with thickness and sealing.

Our Anodising line is the second largest in Hungary.

The maximal size of anodised product is: 7000 mm lenght x 350 mm width x 1800 mm high

Our Anodising line is ideal to anodise extruded profiles, large sheet products, and wlded aluminium parts.
Standard Anodising thicknesses: 5-10-15-20-25 mikron. Standard process: E6/EV1, means etching and pickeling
Standard Anodising colours: C0 Natur,

Capacity: 700 m2 pro shift, total capacity per year 600.000 M2

HKB CERT

Készítette: newtime kft.

Contact Telefon: 76/546-013
GORTER FÉMIPARI ZRT. Fax: 76/546-010
Kerekegyháza, Dózsa György út 1.     Email: info@gorterzrt.hu